The main rule that governs healthcare privacy is derived from a 1996 Federal Law called the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, or HIPAA.

It was fleshed out by the Department of Health and Human Services, which began enforcing it as a regulation in 2002 and although the rule predates the rise of social media, its provision applies to what the regulations call “protected health information” in either digital or paper form.

The rule applies to all so-called "covered entities" -- which includes individual and group health plans, health care clearinghouses or really any health care provider who transmits health information -- and its implications extend to the worlds digital and social media.

A major goal of the Privacy Rule is to assure that an individuals’ health information is properly protected without restricting the flow of that information needed to facilitate high-quality health care.

In this episode of the FIR B2B Podcast, Paul Gillin and I discuss the critical role online advertising plays in building demand for products and services with Greg Johns, SVP, Senior Director Digital Strategy at Initiative and new research by Joseph Turow (@joeprof) and Michael Hennessey from Annenberg (@APCCPenn) and Nora Draper (@NoraADraper) the University of New Hampshire that finds most Americans do not believe ‘data for discounts’ is a square deal.

“It’s a misnomer that people don’t trust the media,” says Greg Johns. “The truth is that people rely on paid media quite a bit to make decisions, and they rely on brands to help guide them.”

Social media policies aren’t typically the first things that come to mind when you’re developing a social media marketing strategy. But they should be. Without social media policies in place, social media marketing plans are unsustainable. On social networks, reach is a function of engagement. Without engagement,...

When critics use social networks to focus negative attention on a company, brand, product or service, social media pundits call them social media horror stories But before you assume that what you've got is an actual, bona fide social media horror story, use this litmus test...