I read it and here's my take. The New FDA Social Media Policy [PDF] is unlikely to achieve it’s stated purpose of encouraging “…the use of school media technologies to enhance communications." Developing social media policies at big organizations is tough business. Anyone who's done it will tell you. Still, given that many social media policies that have violated the National Labor Relations Act so far, I’m surprised to see the new policy make what appear to some pretty basic mistakes with respect to NLRA compliance, particularly since the FDA is among the last big US Federal Agencies to publish a social media policy, which means they’ve had plenty of time to develop these new rules.

Social media policies aren’t typically the first things that come to mind when you’re developing a social media marketing strategy.But they should be.Without social media policies in place, social media marketing plans are unsustainable. On social networks, reach is a function of engagement. Without engagement,...

When critics use social networks to focus negative attention on a company, brand, product or service, social media pundits call them social media horror storiesBut before you assume that what you've got is an actual, bona fide social media horror story, use this litmus test...

Are you ready to win the war against digital illiteracy?The first step is the toughest one. But it's also the most important.Provide everyone with clear-cut, easy-to-follow guidelines to help them distinguish between conversations that can happen in public, and conversations that need to be kept...

Social media advocacy by groups like the AARP shaped the debate over national healthcare reform last year, and will hold tremendous sway over the outcomes of the current budget stalemate, the 2012 presidential election and next year’s budget debate (Republicans have already proposed $4 trillion in cuts in the 2012 federal budget).  Web 2.0 advocacy is now a decisive lever in national policy debates, and has been put to good use recently by organizations not immediately associated with blogs, Facebook and Twitter, according to communications leaders at nationwide advocacy groups.Social media activism helps organizations of every political stripe to efficiently mobilize  members around policy debates, and the power of such tactics has been skyrocketing alongside social media adoption.  The value of new media advocacy lies it is ability to drive engagement as part of a call to action.With budget matters so hotly debated that the federal government is approaching a shutdown, communications pros for organizations on both sides of the debate need to make the very most of two-way social media conversations to win the day. If you were tasked with finding, and inspiring, constituents in a group to call Congressmen, vote for a candidate or join a protest, how would you use social media to get your people moving?